About the author

Tim Moss

Tim Moss has supported over 100 expeditions across all seven continents. He has climbed new mountains, crossed a desert on foot and recently cycled 13,000 miles around the world. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society London and a Guinness World Record Holder. He aims to encourage more people to live adventurously. Read more...

17 Comments

  1. 1

    Alex Hibbert

    Isn’t this just encouraging the modern trait of trying to go from zero experience to a symbolic peak in a few months? Surely an article on ‘How to start alpine mountaineering’?

    Reply
  2. 2

    Tim Moss

    Hmm, you may be right.

    What I’ve tried to do here is give some information about the mountain and how you can climb it. If people read it and choose to take the fast-track then that would be a shame and rather missing the point of my website as a whole but I guess it’s their choice.

    I hope that the kind of people who read this site regularly will take it in amidst the broader messages and not tend towards that preference but, regardless, I would always argue in favour of informing people.

    If someone reads this and takes the fast-track option anyway then hopefully they’ll at least know what country they are a climbing from, that there’s more than one route to the top and that it is indeed possible to climb it independently.

    Reply
  3. 3

    Tim Moss

    P.S. I’ve actually got “How To Be An Alpinist” on my list! Though I suspect it’s a little more niche and bit a more woolly…

    Reply
  4. 4

    Chris

    I think Alex makes a valid point, I do think the level of inexperience on Everest is shocking at times and often undermines the individual accomplishments of others on the mountain, past or present. But if this article serves as inspiration to get out and do something extraordinary then it serves an important purpose.
    To me Everest is not inspiring; there are so many peaks out there that remain unclimed. Although I would enjoy following in the footsteps of giants like Norgay, Hillary, Mallory, or Irving, why not make your own footsteps for other people to follow?

    As an aside, Kenton Cool cast commercial expeditions in a better light than before with his article in the latest BMC Summit magazine, worth a read.

    Reply
  5. 5

    Alex Hibbert

    Thanks for the responses guys and apologies for the delay in replying. Don’t get me wrong, I think that the post is interesting and well written. My concern with it is that it implies that if you want to climb Everest than you simply need to research the route and funding requirements, rather than spend years in the mountains learning the art. This latter course of action would mean more experienced climbers climbing Everest independently, with less pressure on guides and Sherpas, and more use of the other routes.

    Reply
  6. 6

    Tim Moss

    Now that, Mr Hibbert, is a far more incisive point!

    In explanation, the truth, of course, is if you just want to climb Everest then the “easiest” method is as you suggest – get some cash, pick a guide and let them tell you what to do (which will undoubtedly involve climbing other mountains but not likely, as you say, spend years learning the art of mountaineering).

    The number climbing it independently and those motivated to try doing so must be a tiny fraction and thus an article focusing on that wouldn’t be of much benefit to many people. (Though you could argue that such an article would be more interesting and fitting for this site).

    That, of course, doesn’t justify me putting such advice online…

    So, by small manner of justification, I only hope that this article can be taken in context of the series of How To pieces of which this is by far the most main stream.

    Reply
  7. 7

    Jack Bright

    I enjoyed reading this article and with all the talk of commercialism over alpinism I would be interested to read an article about who is actually climbing everest and how they manage to finance it!?

    Reply
  8. 8

    Tim Moss

    Jack, your best bet for the latest Everest info is ExplorersWeb.

    They have a list of expeditions taking place each year – http://www.explorersweb.com/info.php?area=expeditions

    Reply
  9. 9

    Betsy Campbell

    Ok… well, I’m fascinated! Just finished John Krakauer’s book, and can’t stop thinking about the idea. Preblem is, I’m not a climber. I’m a runner! How do I get started? I’m 46 years old. And I’ve only hiked before. Help!!! I guess I’m one of those mentioned above… No experience, but fascinated and determined.

    Reply
    1. 9.1

      calcagnolibero

      Betsy, you’ not a climber, you red Thin Air , you want to climb Everest?
      I don’t want to be rude but I’m wondering if you did understand the book.

      Reply
      1. 9.1.1

        Tim Moss

        Thanks for the comment but do remember that no one is born a climber and everyone has to start somewhere. Jon Krakauer’s book is obviously a harrowing tale but it is also inspiring in its own way.

  10. 10

    Tim Moss

    Hi Betsy, Jon’s book is great, I’m glad it didn’t put you off! Is it particularly Everest that piques your interest or just mountaineering in general?

    If you’ve no experience then the best first steps would probably be to start with camping, hiking and rock climbing then build up to winter walking and mountaineering before moving onto bigger mountains and altitude. That might sound like a long process but then it’s a big mountain.

    Of course, if you have money and just want to summit then you can pay a company/guide to tell you what to do!

    Reply
  11. 11

    Simmon Phuthego

    i have read all this important info very deep and educational..my wish is to go climb the EVEREST m an amateur i guess you guys can help 1 way or the ada..oping to hear from you soon

    thnks

    Reply
  12. 12

    Mark Wright

    I think Everest is a bit too much for good ole me. By the way, do anyone here by any chance know how much time travelling on foot in the mountains take? Like, 10mi a day or something like that?

    Reply
    1. 12.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks Mark. If you’re asking how far you might typically walk in a day in the mountains then that’s a very broad question (the terrain, height gain, weight carried and fitness would all be factors) but 10 miles might be reasonable.

      Reply
  13. 13

    lakshmi.suryavamsi

    WOW IM INTRESTED TOP CILMB MOUNT EVEREST

    Reply
    1. 13.1

      Tim Moss

      I’m glad you’re so enthusiastic Lakshmi.

      Reply

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