About the author

Tim Moss

Tim Moss has supported over 100 expeditions across all seven continents. He has climbed new mountains, crossed a desert on foot and recently cycled 13,000 miles around the world. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society London and a Guinness World Record Holder. He aims to encourage more people to live adventurously. Read more...

6 Comments

  1. 1

    Korpijaakko

    I can recall but only one real low moment. That one was in the beginning of second week of hiking in Lapland. I had done a week of nice hiking with friends who left back South and I was to continue hiking for another week. I was hiking up from Signaldalen in great scenery and with weather even better than the scenery – but didn’t find it inspiring or interesting at all. Not a tiniest bit. After a lunch break I hiked back down to the valley and drove back home in the South. I still regret that decision.

    The other lows, well, they aren’t really lows. More like experiences and learning. =)

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  2. 2

    Alan Curr

    You have hit upon one of my favourite topics here. I love expedition misery because it is unquestionably what you look back on fondly afterwards. I particularly like number five!

    My own was about a decade ago when doing a challenge called “Jailbreak” – six of us in teams of two had to get as far away from (and back to) Trafalgar Square as possible in 72 hours with nothing but £100 and our passports. I ended up sleeping on a bench at Liege Train Station in Belgium using an (empty) water bottle as a pillow. I awoke at about 3am with a tramp urinating onto the tracks about three feet away and I had never been more miserable.

    Laughing about it back in a bar on the Sunday night in central London (wiith all teams having blown the budget and thus being disqualified) made me realise that I wanted to spent my life doing that sort of nonsense!

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  3. 3

    Korpijaakko

    “Some of my favourite expedition memories are from the lowest points.”
    “I love expedition misery because it is unquestionably what you look back on fondly afterwards.”

    Tim & Alan, you are both British, right? Then I might understand the comments, otherwise I’m not sure. No offense, but instead of lows I try to concentrate on highs, achievements and the simple life in general. Though some may see simple as miserable?

    I’d rather go with the classic: “Adventure is just bad planning.” ;)

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  4. 4

    Tim Moss

    Thanks Korpijaako, I am indeed British and you’re not the first to pick up on our nation’s predilection for discomfort.

    I wouldn’t claim to necessarily enjoy these things at the time and certainly wouldn’t aim to get myself into that sort of situation deliberately but when I look back over years of expeditions, the difficult times stand out at least as much as the those times when everything goes perfectly.

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  5. 5

    Korpijaakko

    Thanks for the explanation, Tim! I agree, that hard times are at least as easy to remember than the high points. And the best part is, that you can learn from yoru on and others mistakes and misery.

    Reply
  6. 6

    Alan Curr

    Indeed, I’m British too Korpijaakko and certainly I never plan to incorpate any misery on my trips, but I think it’s just part of the ride and overcoming those difficulties are incredibly satisfying.

    Reply

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