About the author

Tim Moss

Tim Moss has supported over 100 expeditions across all seven continents. He has climbed new mountains, crossed a desert on foot and recently cycled 13,000 miles around the world. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society London and a Guinness World Record Holder. He aims to encourage more people to live adventurously. Read more...

3 Comments

  1. 1

    Janne

    What about number of failures or problems? Any difference in the experiences?

    Reply
  2. 2

    Tim Moss

    Hi Janne, that’s the pertinent question really.

    I think broadly the theory is that external gears have little problems regularly that are easier to fix, either yourself or by any local mechanic.

    In contrast, an internal hub isn’t supposed to ever go wrong but if it does then it’s much harder to fix (although I’ve heard that Rohloff are good at sending replacements).

    Reply
  3. 3

    mark

    One other possible reason for people not using internal gear hubs is because the vast majority of bicycle frames are not internal hub compatible. One must buy or have a frame that is internal hub compatible before even considering these. I love my titanium frame from Lynskey, but I’m not going to buy a DIFFERENT kind of bike frame just because it is compatible with a Rohloff. It’s not just the cost of the internal hub. It’s also important to consider the cost and the variety/selection of the frames available.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

© 2015 - Tim Moss - The Next Challenge