About the author

Tim Moss

Tim Moss has supported over 100 expeditions across all seven continents. He has climbed new mountains, crossed a desert on foot and recently cycled 13,000 miles around the world. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society London and a Guinness World Record Holder. He aims to encourage more people to live adventurously. Read more...

27 Comments

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  3. 3

    Giovanni mugliett

    Does anybody know what type of gas canister are easy to be found in south east asia!!! Especially in Cambodia?!!

    Reply
    1. 3.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Giaovanni, we cycled across Cambodia a couple of years ago but I think we mostly just bought food, because it was so cheap, rather than using our camping stove.

      However, my hunch is that ‘piercable’ canisters will be the easiest to find. But, if you find a camping shop (e.g. in Phnom Penh), I suspect it will be ‘screw-on’.

      Do let me know how you get on.

      Reply
      1. 3.1.1

        Tim Moss

        Update: I asked on Twitter and was told that ‘aerosol’ canisters are the most readily available in Cambodia.

        You can see the exchange here.

        To use an aerosol canister, your best bet would probably be:
        – Get a free-standing stove (i.e. one that sits on the ground and attaches to the canister with a hose: like these)
        – Get an adaptor (like this one on Amazon or this one from Mercator Gear)

  4. 4

    Sandie

    Hi, Tim. I have been sold a bleuet 206 plus with cv 300 canisters. Surely I can’t use easy clip canisters instead of the 260 or 260 plus pierceable ones the manufacturers recommend? Thanks!

    Reply
    1. 4.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Sandie,

      I don’t think so, no.

      The adaptors let screw-on stoves used other types of canister. But with a piercable stove, like the Bleuet 206 Plus, you are stuck with piercable canisters.

      Good luck!

      Tim.

      Reply
      1. 4.1.1

        Sandie

        Thanks, Tim, all the wiser now. :-)

  5. 5

    Haakon Stubstad Henriksen

    Hi Tim! Really informative article.

    Normally when I camp/hunt/hike, I like to pack really light (for obvious reasons) and the Primus Omnifuel is my companion. However, I’ve recently looked into a more base-camp type stove, and have landed on the Camp Chef Everest. This product is not sold in Europe (certainly not Norway, where I live), and thus is fitted for the 16.4 oz gas canister. We usually only get the screw on canisters here in Norway, so could I for example buy the Kovea adaptor in order to use screw-on canisters for this stove? Any answer is appreciated.

    Best regards

    Haakon

    Reply
    1. 5.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Haakon,

      The adaptors allow screw-on stoves to use other types of canister (clip-on, aerosol and puncture). They don’t work the other way around i.e. they don’t let you use screw-on canisters with other types of stove.

      I’m afraid I don’t know of any that work the other way around.

      Good luck!

      Reply
  6. 6

    Stuart

    Hi Tim,

    I can’t quite see if there is a thread on this. It looks like it is a clip on though like the Easy-Clic?

    https://ae01.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1S_oYMXXXXXc6XVXXq6xXFXXXj.jpg

    Could you let me know which cannister to buy?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. 6.1

      Tim Moss

      Hey Stuart,

      That looks like it is threaded to me. You can see an Easy-Clic fitting here: https://goo.gl/images/WpTU85

      If nothing else, 90% of camping stoves use screw-on canisters so the odds favour that.

      Thanks,
      Tim.

      Reply
  7. 7

    Daniel

    Thanks for this – we were recently caught out in the alps by a lack of screw canisters (despite looking in a number of shops in both Switzerland and Italy), and I was searching for some reliable information on adaptors so we have a back up in future. Thanks for providing it.

    Reply
    1. 7.1

      Tim Moss

      Glad you found it useful Daniel. You only need to get caught out once for it to be a real pain! I hope you managed to source some adaptors.

      Reply
  8. 8

    Simon Hopper

    I’m travelling in Africa next year with my lady, two up by motorbike. What’s the best kind of stove to use there (we’ll be riding down the west coast route north to south)?

    If I am to keep her happy, I must be able to make tea each morning!

    Reply
    1. 8.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Simon,

      I’ve not been to west Africa but I suspect you won’t be able to reliably find camping gas on sale. If so, your best bet will be a stove that burns petrol instead, because you can get that every time you fill up your bike.

      See this article: Comparison of Multi Fuel Stoves

      An MSR Whisperlite, MSR Dragonfly or Primus Omnifuel are all safe bets.

      Thanks,
      Tim.

      Reply
  9. 9

    John Gallacher

    As I am desperate for information, I thought you might give advice. ! I have come accross some small gas canisters in my late parents house. They will be about 10 yrs old but not too rusty but I need to dispose of them. They are small, red ¨Gaskartuche¨ gross weight 290 grams (Butane 180 grams) Have tried recycling centres and outlets to retun them. No one is interested as they are full. Problem is that I do not have the fitting to empty them and I am apprehensive about puncturing them. They would have been purchased in the Canary Islands (Spain)

    Reply
    1. 9.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi John,

      That certainly sounds like a bit of a pickle. Does it look like any of the canisters in this article? You’d be welcome to send me some photos, in case we can find a stove that would fit them.

      Thanks,
      Tim.

      Reply
  10. 10

    Andrew lloyd

    Hi tim hope you can help me i have gas stove at my allotment for last four months been using two types of makes of 227g gas for the summit gas stove but lots of gas is left in canisters double checked stove cleaned jets ect but it still happen is it to do with tempreture i know its cold sometimes down there what can i do

    Reply
    1. 10.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Andrew,

      That does sound like it could be temperature related.

      When gas canisters (which actually contain liquid, not gas) get cold, the liquid sinks to the bottom of the canister. You can test this by shaking the canister or warming it up (e.g. with your hands or down your top) before you use it. If it burns better after you’ve done those things, even if only briefly, then it’s probably the cold.

      Some stoves have a “pre heat tube” that means the stove still works with the canister turned upside down, which means it works better in the cold. See my article ‘Comparison of Gas Stoves‘ for details.

      I hope that helps.

      Tim.

      Reply
  11. 11

    Tia

    Hi Tim,
    Thank you for an informative article. Great for a gas novice, like me. I have always used fuel stoves like Trangia, but recently got a Jetboil. Is there any difference between gas cartridges e.g. GoSystem vs. Jetboil. Jetboil gas seems to be more expensive, but is it worth it?!

    Tiia

    Reply
    1. 11.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Tia,

      Thanks for the question and apologies for the slow reply. I didn’t know the answer so I put it on Twitter and got some interesting responses.

      You can read all of the responses here but here’s the summary:

      • There are only a few manufacturers of [screw thread] canisters world wide, and they manufacture all the different brands. So two different brands often come off the same production line in Korea.
      • The main difference is the proportion of propane to butane. More propane = better cold weather performance. The exact mix of propane, butane and isobutane is usually secret. But above 5 degreees Celsius (41 Fahrenheit), you probably don’t need any butane
      • Some people seem to think that certain brands give a more consistent flow and let you use the full canister better. But that’s not widely experienced, there’s no obvious consistency in which are the best/worst brands, and I don’t know of any reason that would be true (ultimately, they are just metal pots filled with gas).
      • Finally, the stove set up (e.g. stove model, windshield, heat reflector, heat exchangers on the pots) is a much bigger factor than the canister type.
      • I hope that helps.

        Tim.

      Reply
  12. 12

    Allan

    Great overview, particularly the tips on carrying adapters to improve your odds of finding fuel.

    For what it’s worth, the aerosol-type canisters were very prevalent on my trip to southern Chile this year — they seem to be associated with the cheaper-looking stoves imported from China and elsewhere. I also noticed folks putting mini-blowtorches on top of them to toast their bread!

    Reply
    1. 12.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks Alan. That’s useful to know that aerosol canisters are well-stocked in Chile!

      Reply
  13. 13

    Pat

    Hi Tim, I have an old Campingaz heater that uses the pierceable canisters that are hard to find in Canada. I contacted Campingaz to see if they have an adapter so that I could use the screw on canisters like the Number 5 example you show that are readily available in various sizes here. I looked at your adapters but I am not sure which of these might work. Any help finding a solution would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

    Reply
    1. 13.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Pat,

      I’m afraid I’m not aware of any adapters that allow you to use other canisters on a pierceable stove. The adapters only work for the more common (and safer) screw-on stoves.

      Do let me know if you find otherwise but I think you would either have to track down some pierceable canisters or buy a new heater.

      Sorry not to be of more help.

      Tim.

      Reply
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