About the author

Tim Moss

Tim Moss has supported over 100 expeditions across all seven continents. He has climbed new mountains, crossed a desert on foot and recently cycled 13,000 miles around the world. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society London and a Guinness World Record Holder. He aims to encourage more people to live adventurously. Read more...

37 Comments

  1. 1

    Korpijaakko

    Just a note: There were also 2,1L and 3,0L pots on the old Eta series. The first I own and the latter I used on Svalbard expedition in 2011 so they have also been around for some time.

    I don’t really like the new plastic lids (heavier, more prone to damage) but otherwise the new pots look a lot better. I assume that the protected ehat element also adds fuel efficiency.

    Reply
    1. 1.1

      Tim Moss

      Ah, thanks for the update Korpijaakko. It’ll be interesting to see how the lids hold up over a year’s daily usage.

      Reply
  2. 2

    annabelle

    The new eta pots state not to let stove flame touch the heating element. It says that carbon monoxide will develop. Do you know why that is?

    Thanks

    Reply
    1. 2.1

      Tim Moss

      Hey Annabelle, I’ve no idea about that one I’m afraid. That sounds like “covering their backs” to me. It would be hard to avoid the base of a pan being touched by the flames of a stove onto which it is placed!

      Reply
    2. 2.2

      Tim Moss

      Annabelle, I emailed Rosker (the UK importer for Primus) and received this explanation. I. Hope it helps:

      ” The simple explanation is that carbon monoxide is produced when carbon-containing compounds [such as LPG, gasoline etc] are burned.  Usually a very small, harmless amount of carbon monoxide is produced when operating a stove as opposed to much more carbon dioxide.  When the flame burns in the heating elements, there’s not enough oxygen to form carbon dioxide from every oxidising carbon molecule.  Therefore it forms more carbon Monoxide rather than Carbon Dioxide.

      Even simpler, the Carbon Monoxide is produced when fuel burns with insufficient oxygen supply and this can happen in small spaces like tents.  This is never a problem in the outside or in a well ventilated area.  It is in no way dangerous to use the Eta Pot, but it increases the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning if using it in enclosed and insufficiently ventilated areas.”

      Reply
  3. 3

    Andreas Olausson

    Can i pack everything with the 3L pot in the bag?

    Reply
    1. 3.1

      Tim Moss

      The pots all nestle inside each other if that’s what you mean. So, for example, we have a smaller red pot inside a smaller pan which are both inside a 3l red pot inside a 3l pan, all carried in the mesh case provided.

      Hope that helps?

      Reply
  4. 4

    Marco

    Is there enough space in the eta packing bag for a additional pan? I think i can store a 1l pot inside the 1.8l pot in the whole package and there should be enough space for the burner and one gas cartridge, right?

    Reply
    1. 4.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Marco, the pans are designed to be stackable so, yes, you can fit the 1l inside the 1.8l etc. There is also, of course, room inside the smallest pot (whatever size that is for you). Our smallest is the 1-litre and we fit our Omnilite Ti inside along with spares and repair kit.

      I’m not sure about fitting a gas canister in though. That’s what I think every camper wants for their pans but it rarely seems to work. The tiny 100g gas cartidge might fit but I suspect that’s all.

      Reply
    2. 4.2

      Tim Moss

      Marco, I’ve since checked and I was wrong. There is plenty of space for a gas canister inside even the smallest pan/pot. You might fit a really small stove in too (e.g. pocket rocket) but otherwise, probably better stuffed with coffee sachets or the like. Just emailed you with this correction.

      Reply
  5. 5

    Frik

    Hello,
    I’d like to buy Eta Spider and occasionally I will need to use 3.0l pot.
    I see that diameter of spider is 155mm but 3.0l pot is 200mm, so is it possible to use this together or I have to buy bigger Eta Power with 210mm ?

    Reply
    1. 5.1

      Tim Moss

      I don’t know about the Spider Frik but Ive just emailed my Primus contact to see if they can help.

      Reply
    2. 5.2

      Tim Moss

      Hey Frik, got this back from Primus:

      ” The ETA Spider set & 3L Eta pot are compatible but the difference between the radius of the heat exchanger on the bottom of the pot & the stoves pan support isn’t that great, meaning that the pot could be knocked off stove if you’re not careful. ”

      Sounds like you’re OK if you don’t mind the tight fit. We have a similar issue with the 3.0l ETA pot on the Omnilite-Ti. It’s annoying but eminently usable (we’ve been using ours for the last 9 months of cycling).

      Reply
  6. 6

    doug

    When using the 3 L eta pot on the omnilite does the heat exchanger ring rest on top of the stove supports or do the stove legs fit inside the ring and rest on the bottom of the pot?

    Reply
  7. 7

    Tim Moss

    In theory you can do either. I only ever have it resting on top of the heat exchanger ring though. It’s a delicate balance and, honestly, can be pretty annoying as it’s so easy to knock off.

    It’s easy to fit the stove legs inside the heat exchanger when the stove’s turned off but removing the pot when it’s burning would be awkward.

    Hope that helps,
    Tim.

    Reply
  8. Pingback: Primus OmniLite Ti – Titanium Multi Fuel Stove Review

  9. 8

    Michael

    Hi
    I recently bought a ETA pot. It is unsuitable for use on a wood stove. The smoke goes into the pot under the Lid and contaminates the food making it inedible. Other than that it is a nice pot.

    Michael

    Reply
    1. 8.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks Michael. That’s an interesting one. Is there a particular reason you think it’s happening with the Eta pots? Is it the draining holes in the lid?

      Reply
  10. Pingback: Our Kit List for Cycling Around the World

  11. 9

    Guillaume

    Hi! I’m looking for a *second hand* “Primus TiTech 1.0L”, if you are selling yours, I’ll be glad to receive your offer through 20000km.com

    ciao!

    Reply
    1. 9.1

      Tim Moss

      I’m not selling mine I’m afraid.

      Reply
  12. 10

    Raf Reyes

    Hello,
    I’m thinking of getting an ETA Spider stove system (which includes a 1L ETA pot) and want to use a 1.8L ETA pot as well. I’m thinking if they’ll pack and nestle well to save space. Would you know if the Spider system which includes a wind screen will fit inside the 1.8L pot?

    Reply
    1. 10.1

      Tim Moss

      Hey Raf. I’ve not tried it myself but the Primus website says “Burner, 1-litre pot, windscreen, plastic bowl and a 100-gram gas cartridge simply pack together into one compact unit in the accompanying insulation bag” (and the video on the same page shows it happening) so I am sure they would fit into the larger 1.8-litre pot as well. I can email them to ask if you like, though?

      Reply
  13. 11

    travis

    Not sure if this thread is still active but you seem quite knowledgable on these and I can’t find the info I seek anywhere. Do you happen to know if this would be compatible with a whisperlite? Perhaps even nest inside an empty 1 liter pot? Thanks!!

    Reply
    1. 11.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Travis, thanks for the message. I haven’t personally tried to put a 1-litre Eta pan on top of a Whisperlite or put a Whisperlite inside one. I am confident that the pan would fit on top though as it has a small diamater. As for fitting inside, my OmniLite Ti fits inside the 1-litre pot easily. The Whisperlite is probably slightly larger. I reckon there’s a good chance it would fit but couldn’t say for sure. Sorry not to give a more definitive answer. Do let me know if you try it.

      Thanks,
      Tim.

      P.S. All threads on the site remain open!

      Reply
      1. 11.1.1

        Travis

        Thanks Tim! Your response and opinion are much appreciated! I think I’m going to give it a try and will update here if I do.

  14. 12

    RonanS

    Hi Tim, just bought one of the ETA pots / with hear exchanger. There isnt any reason I can’t use this on a small BBQ, is there? (Heading off on a family holiday for few days and trying to compromise on space as we’re flying to get there.) Thanks, Ronan

    Reply
    1. 12.1

      Tim Moss

      Don’t think so. It’ll probably just get black with soot. And watch you don’t melt the plastic coating on the handles.

      Reply
  15. 13

    Skipper Lay

    Thanks for all the threads on Primus ETA pots. I have older ETA pots (1.7 ltr and 2 ltr. nesting pots with conventional lids with “D-ring” holders) that I have coupled with the MSR Superfly canister stove. The SuperFly is extremely light and fits all canisters, whether with threaded top or not. The heat exchanger rings were too small diameter for the wings of the SuperFly, so I carefully cut out a small segment of heat exchanger with my Dremel drill/grinder for each wing, then used a paint pen opposite the cuts at bottom of pot for “3” and “4” wing stoves. The SuperFly is 4-wing (4.6 oz.), but the MSR Pocket Rocket is 3-wing (3 oz.) The fit on/off from pot to stove is still not perfect, but works with practice. I just wish the pots were lighter, although mine have turned out very durable over many trips.

    Reply
    1. 13.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks for that Skipper. I’ve seen other people try that with their heat exchangers: cutting out sections so the stove legs fit inside. Neat idea.

      I’ve done a big comparison of different stoves, including the SuperFly and Pocket Rocket here: http://thenextchallenge.org/camping-gas-canister-stoves/

      Reply
  16. 14

    Shaun

    Hi Tim,

    Great blog – it helps the hours pass in work before the next trip! And this ended up longer than planned too, so hope it helps – it’s all intended to be constructive.

    I haven’t read through all your comments so apologies if this has been said. As an engineer I can’t help but point this out to you! You suggest that the downside is the weight but this is offset by the fuel saving in that they are more efficient “i.e. the pan’s 100g heavier but I can take 100ml less fuel”.

    Only comment is that 100ml fuel doesn’t equal 100g, more like 70-80g depending on fuel type – working on liquid fuels here. At 70g/100ml this would mean you’d have to leave out 140ml+ of fuel to offset the same weight. Thats almost half of the small fuel bottles! OK, actually 40% and proportionally less of the 0.6l and 1l sizes.

    So boiling times were 2m8s and 3m11s, thus 128s and 191s which is pretty much bang on 50% longer! – thats a great bit of info. The inverse would be to say the ETA pans use about 67% of the fuel than a standard pan does.

    With the above in mind then if 33% of the fuel bottle volume (i.e. 100% – 67%) is greater than 100g, or more easily quantifyable 140ml, then the weight offset would be worth while.

    Now we probably wouldnt set out to only fill our fuel bottles to 2/3rds full nor only to 140ml less than the max; but usefully a 350ml fuel bottle is 58% of the 600ml. And the 600ml is obviously 60% of the 1L. Which isnt too far off comparable to the increase in fuel efficiency. Providing you weren’t planning on running on fumes and had a little spare capacity then you could probably get away with carrying a 350ml bottle instaed of a 600ml and a 600ml instead of a 1L

    Anyway, only nit picking, its a great and very informative article. Feel free to copy any of this into your article if you were to want to – no royalties needed!

    Keep up the good work.
    Shaun
    http://www.ChasingTheSunrise.org

    Reply
    1. 14.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks for the analysis Shaun. I think I meant ‘offset’ in the general sense of fuel efficiency is an advantage which you might balance against the extra weight.

      If you need enough fuel for two month’s in Antarctica then that would be a big advantage. For one night’s camping, it won’t be.

      Still, your number crunching’s a great addition. Thanks for doing it!

      Reply
  17. 15

    Mark

    Hi Tim,

    Would you be able to tell me the internal diameter and height of the 3L and 1.8L pot. I want to make a mock-up to see what I can fit inside. Also what is the internal diameter of the heat exchanger – I want to know if it will work with my stove.

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. 15.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Mark,

      I just dug out my pan and a tape measure for you.

      3-litre pot: 19.5cm diameter, 10.5cm depth. Internal diameter of heat exchanger: 14.5cm.

      I hadn’t noticed you wanted the 1.8-litre pot as well so will get back to you with that.

      Tim.

      UPDATE:

      Hi Mark, I got all the stuff out again to check the measurements for you:

      3-Litre Eta pot dimensions

        Diameter: 19.5cm
        Depth: 10.5cm
        Heat exchanger internal diameter: 14.5cm

      1.8-Litre Eta pot dimensions

        Diameter: 17cm
        Depth: 8.5cm
        Heat exchanger internal diameter: 12cm

      I hope that helps.

      Tim.

      Reply
  18. 16

    John Hamilton

    So, only six months since the previous post… I just got a Eta 1.0 liter pot, and I’m wondering how the nonstick is holding up for you? What kind of utensils do you use in yours (wood, plastic, metal)? Really, I’m wondering if I can use my titanium spork to eat right out of the pot, or if I need to go to a plastic one.

    Oh, and Merry Christmas!

    Reply
    1. 16.1

      Tim Moss

      Hey John,

      We used our non-stick for over a year on the road and it held up fine. We used a wooden spoon for cooking but frequently ate out of it with metal sporks. It’s got a few scratches but is otherwise pretty good.

      Happy New Year!

      Tim.

      Reply
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