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Tim Moss

Tim Moss set up The Next Challenge in 2009 after people kept asking what his next challenge was.

Me on the Carretera Austral, Chile

Tim left a job organising arctic expeditions for the British Schools Exploring Society to go freelance, using his experience of adventures and challenges to set up his own company.

Tim has organised expeditions to all seven continents, made first and first-British ascents of several mountains from Russia to Bolivia, and has travelled around the world using eighty methods of transport, a trip for which he won the Year Of The Volunteer ‘Award for Innovation’. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, a current Guinness World Record Holder and was recently shortlisted for the Light My Fire ‘Adventurer of the Year’ award.

Until recently he lived in London with his wife Laura with whom he is joined in most of his adventures. His first book - How to Get to the North Pole: and Other Iconic Adventures - was published by How To Books Ltd. in April 2012 with contributions from over 50 great expeditioners and a foreword by Sir Ranulph Fiennes.

In August 2013, he and Laura left their London lives behind to begin cycling around the world.

Tim’s Expeditions

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Tim Moss Bio

Tim’s life began in Kyrgyzstan.

Not literally, of course, he was actually born in the much more normal sounding Kingston-upon-Thames. But it was in this little known Central Asian country that he began a journey.

The expedition was a disaster – he didn’t climb any mountains and diced with death far more times than can be considered healthy for a summer holiday – but the result was the discovery of a love for adventure.

A subsequent and more successful mountaineering trip to Bolivia followed and before he had even got home, he had another idea. Teaming up with his friend Thom, with whom he had shared a rope in Kyrgyzstan, they used every method of transport they could find to travel Around the World in 80 Ways the following summer; a trip which saw them on the front page of a national paper and recognised on the street as “Those guys from the TV!”.

These early trips were supported by the Expedition & Travel Committee at Tim’s university. After graduating, he was invited to join as a committee member himself and has been mentoring UCL students on their expeditions ever since.

The day he arrived back from his around the world adventure, a friend approached him for help cycling a rickshaw across America. Apparently, Tim had built a reputation as someone who “knows about that sort of thing” and this sowed the seed for an idea that would later come to fruition.

Returning from a Masters Degree in New Zealand where Tim learned to love his bicycle, he took up residence in the Royal Geographical Society, working for youth development charity BSES Expeditions. In addition to giving hands-on experience of Arctic expeditions and logistics, it exposed him to a whole new world of adventurous people.

During his time at BSES, Tim raised some money for the charity by visiting his old sidekick, Thom, on the Isle of Wight. In typical style, he did so by cycling to the south coast, swimming the Solent and running across the island to Thom’s house. He trained for the event by running up 50,000 steps to the height of Mount Everest and appeared on TV again, this time after having his bike stolen during training (and promptly replaced by the kind act of a viewer).

Having squeezed in another climbing expedition, this time to Russia, word began to spread and Tim found himself helping more and more people with their own challenges and this gave him one more idea.

Tim made the decision to leave full time employment and cut back his income in favour of a life with more time to pursue adventures and help others with theirs.

He now runs The Next Challenge, a website where he writes about his experiences and tries to encourage others to embrace life as an adventure.

Since then he has broken a Guinness World Record in a rickshaw, run the length of every Tube line in London, spent five months living in Oman where he crossed the small Wahiba Sands desert on foot and later tried to do the same across South Ameirca. He has also been elected as a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, worked for the Kaspersky Commonwealth Antarctic Expedition, supported Sarah Outen’s London2London: via the World project, spoken at St James’s Palace and been invited to meet the Queen at Buckingham Palace, and written his first book How to Get to the North Pole: and Other Iconic Adventures.

He has also supported over a hundred different individuals, expeditions and groups. Will you be next?

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