About the author

Tim Moss

Tim Moss has supported over 100 expeditions across all seven continents. He has climbed new mountains, crossed a desert on foot and recently cycled 13,000 miles around the world. He is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society London and a Guinness World Record Holder. He aims to encourage more people to live adventurously. Read more...

88 Comments

  1. 1

    Tom Allen (@tomsbiketrip)

    Nice article. Very useful for those researching such stoves. You’ve obviously put a huge amount of time into this!

    A couple of things that might be worth adding/changing:

    – The MSR Whisperlite Universal can simmer in canister mode
    – Trangia have a multifuel burner kit for their stove sets
    – Worldwide availability (including of service kits, spare parts and repair centres) might be worth mentioning

    Good work mate!

    Reply
    1. 1.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks for that Tom.

      – I think all the stoves can simmer when using gas canisters but I’ve added a note about it.
      – Thanks for the heads-up on the Trangia multifuel kit. I love it! Will get it added shortly.
      – Interesting. I’m not sure any spares/repairs kits are widely available in shops (the only candidate would be MSR). They’re so small that I’d always recommend carrying spares on a long trip. Otherwise, they’re small enough that you could order them online for international delivery.

      Reply
  2. 2

    Will

    Hi Tim,

    Thank you for all your help. Quick question, I’m getting a stove, there’s a sale where they’re selling two primus stoves. One is the omnilite ti which is 239g and £169, the other is a Primus express spider that’s only £75 but weighs 198g. The express spider is a lower btu output at 7150 and I don’t think it comes with many of accessories (maybe they quickly add up in price?), but at £75, this seems like a bargain right? Am I missing something? It’s lighter and cheaper?….
    Thanks again,

    Will

    Reply
    1. 2.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Will, from what I can see, the Express Spider is a gas stove not a multi fuel stove i.e. it can only take screw-on (threaded) butane/propane gas canisters and not burn any liquid fuels. Gas stoves are always cheaper than multi fuel.

      You could convert the Express Spider to burn liquid fuels with a Primus Multi Fuel Kit above. That would cost another £50.

      If you just want a gas stove then the Express Spider looks nice and very light for a free-standing stove. However, unless I’ve missed something, it only costs £50 at Cotswold and £40 at AllOutdoor so £75 doesn’t seem like much of a deal. Otherwise, gas stoves start from about £20.

      Does that help? Do let us know what you decide.

      Reply
      1. 2.1.1

        Tim Moss

        Will, if you’re still shopping for a stove then I’ve just completed a review of Gas Canister Stoves (like the Express Spider you were looking at). It’s here if it’s useful: http://www.thenextchallenge.org/camping-gas-canister-stoves/

  3. 3

    Jan Blecha

    It’s deffinetely not one of the top stoves, but in your chart is missing one of the cheapest multifuel stove Pinguin Pyro. I’m heading for short Greenland expedition (first and probably last one in my live) so I’m thinking about buying multifuel stove. The only thing I need is possibility to burn any fuel and low price (but not due to a quality). Do you have some recomendation for me? (here is my choice MSR Whisperlite Universal, GoSystem Gemini Extreme or Pinguin Pyro). Thank you anyway for this very useful research.

    Reply
    1. 3.2

      Tim Moss

      Hey Jan, thanks for the Pyro link! I’ll get that added shortly (takes a bit of time to cross check all of the little details).

      As for a stove that burns any type of fuel, if you’re not bothered about gas then the options are Optimus, Primus and the MSR XGK. None of others (including the Whisperlite Universal you mentioned) burn diesel which is probably the fuel you’re most likely to find if petrol’s not available. They’re all pretty similar really but the Primus are my favourite, the XGK is known to be solid and the Optimus Nova is the cheapest.

      However, if you really just meant ‘burns petrol/gasoline’ then the Whisperlite International is much cheaper than the Universal and lighter (only difference is that the Universal burns gas canisters). The Hexon Multifuel is pretty cheap too and even lighter.

      I wasn’t sure if you meant ‘low price’ for the stove (rather than for the fuel you’re expecting to us). If so, the Whisperlite International, again, is probably your best bet. Almost the same price as the Go Systems Gemini but with a very good reputation (I’ve not used the Gemini myself but my *hunch* is that it may not be the best quality)

      I hope that helps.

      Reply
      1. 3.2.1

        Jan Blecha

        Thanks for exhausting answer, but when I said “any fuel” I meaned liquid and gas too (sorry for misunderstanding). I would like to burn “clean” propane/ butane and when it’s not avaible, than liquid fuels starting with the best, cleanest ones. I know that universal stoves are not as good as only-liquid, but I’m gonna use it on ordinary camping with family, when I don’t want to smell like petrol station =) Therefore I chose Primus MultiFuel EX for prize about USD 105. If you are interested, I can measure and send you some properties for you (weight, size), make some pictures and so…

      2. 3.2.2

        Eddie

        In Greenland, they use jet A to heat houses. This started when they brought in the helicopter fleet years ago. So a stove that runs on this would be a good plan. Petrol should be available too.

        I got this from the in flight magazine last week when returning from 5 weeks there. It answered my question as to why there were oil drums full of jet A outside the houses in the settlements.

      3. Tim Moss

        Thanks for that Eddie.

        So, anyone going to Greenland, you’ll want any of the stoves listed above that burn Kerosene.

    2. 3.3

      Tim Moss

      Hi Jan, hope the Greenland trip went well. Pinguin Pyro now added to the chart. Just waiting to hear back from them with some of the details.

      Reply
  4. 4

    Jan Blecha

    One more is missing Primus MultiFuel EX which is my favourite at this time :)

    Reply
    1. 4.1

      Tim Moss

      Nice one Jan. Thank you. I think I’d assumed the Multifuel and Multifuel EX were just generic names for the Omnifuel because they look so similar. More stats to add to the chart in due course!

      Reply
      1. 4.1.1

        Tim Moss

        Jan, I’ve now added the latest version of the Multifuel to the review: Multifuel III.

  5. 5

    Graham

    Great review, amazing to see so many together – lots of work! After damaging the pump on my Primus Omnifuel when the bottle simply fell over, I have gone back to my faithful Svea123r.

    Reply
    1. 5.1

      Tim Moss

      Nice once Graham! I’ll get the Svea 123R added in due course. I can already tell it’s going to be number one on looks!

      Reply
    2. 5.2

      Tim Moss

      Graha, Svea 123r duly added to the list. Sounds like quite the cult stove!

      Reply
  6. 6

    Allan Choquer

    Hello
    I just Bought a Optimus Polaris from MEC Feb 24th ( approx $195.00 Cdn ) Unfortunately I have had bad Karma with the fuel Pump delivery .The O rings and rubber for the check valve do not function with all fuels ! The wrong type of materials swell up and block ports and orifices on first fire -so it will require a rebuild and source better O rings .

    My previous Optimus Nova had the same problems -poor design sent seal particles down the line and blocked jets and valve ,and also leaked at threads and caught fire !
    I sent a letter to Optimus and did not receive a reply ! Returned item to MEC and informed them not to sell this item .
    Its a good practise to test a stove before expedition. – I will now consider making my own Titanium stove !
    Regards
    Allan

    Reply
    1. 6.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks for that Allan. Sorry to hear about your problems with the Polaris. I’ve just been sent one to test so I look forward to seeing it for myself.

      Reply
    2. 6.2

      Tim Moss

      Hello again Allan, I’ve completed my review of the Polaris Optifuel and you can read it here: http://thenextchallenge.org/optimus-polaris-stove-review/

      For what it’s worth, I didn’t have any issues with mine.

      Reply
    3. 6.3

      Michael

      Dear Allan,
      this is Michael from Optimus in Switzerland. We are sorry to hear that you have experienced problems with your Polaris stove. Can you please let me know the following:
      which fuel did you use when the problem occured?
      what were the symptons you experienced with the pump (blocked immidiately, over time, did the stove lite up properly etc?)
      which ports and orifices were blocked?
      Is there any chance of getting hold of your stove? I would like to have a look at it…

      I am surprised to hear about this issue, as we have tested the Polaris extensively during its development. After many tests with different fuels we carefully picked The o-rings we found to work in all conditions with all fuels. Also, during the field testing phase we didn`t see this issue. And since the stove is in the market, many consumers have given us very positive feedback.

      Please let me know about the questions above so that we take appropriate steps to help you out.
      Best regards,
      Michael

      Reply
  7. 7

    Darren

    Hi Tim

    I now have this site bookmarked. Fantastic resource for someone like me who is researching their next stove purchase. A couple of requests if I may:

    1. My understanding is that the Soto Muka does simmer. Is this correct?
    2. What are your thoughts on the MSR Windpro and did it replace the Simmerlite?

    You may have guessed that the simmer capability is something that is high on my priorities.

    Reply
    1. 7.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Darren, thanks for the comment and your kind words. Much appreciated. In response to your questions…

      1. The Muka does have some simmer functionality but not fine tuning. You can see on the fuel valve that the ‘Run’ setting indicates a scale from minimum to maximum. The definition I’ve used for simmering (yes/no) is basically whether there is a separate control valve on the base of the stove. The Muka does not have this which means that you have less fine tune control and also that there is a delay between turning the valve and the flame adjusting (like when you turn the hot tap up in the shower and it takes a second to kick in).

      If simmer control is high on your priorities then there are better stoves for this. Also note that any stove burning butane/propane gas canisters will have better simmering too.

      (I assume you saw my review of the Muka, right? http://thenextchallenge.org/soto-muka-multi-fuel-stove/)

      2. I’ve not used the Windpro but it’s obviously a gas canister stove rather than multifuel. It looks nice and the upside-down-canister thing seems to be quite popular now and no doubt a good feature to have. To be honest, when it comes to canister stoves, I’ve not found much difference between them. I’d recommend just picking one that has the right features/weight/cost for you.

      I’m afraid I don’t know if the Windpro has replaced the Simmerlite but MSR’s help team have always replied to my requests so you could try them directly.

      Reply
  8. 8

    Michael Neuner

    Hi Tim,
    regarding the Hexon Multifuel, on several other webpages I saw that the refered 220g are without a pump, so in a kind of gas only configuration. To make it multifuel you have to add at least 100g for pump etc. which puts the weight for comparison above 320g.
    Right or wrong?
    Michael

    Reply
    1. 8.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks for flagging this up Michael. I’ve just contacted Edelrid to find out for sure. Will report back as soon as I hear.

      Reply
      1. 8.1.1

        Tim Moss

        Well, you opened a can of worms there Michael! You’re right that the reported weight for the Hexon Multifuel does not include the pump. With the pump, the total goes from 220g to 330g. That would have made the Kovea Hydra the lightest multifuel stove until I double checked and realised that they too were reporting a weight without the pump included. Sneaky!

        Anyway, Kovea were very helpful when I emailed them and the chart has been duly updated. The Hexon remains the lightest stove but only by 3 grams.

        Thanks again Michael.

  9. 9

    Amit

    Regarding the Primus Omnifuel I found it as a total un reliable stove cause mainly due to poor engineering that show for example at the common leaking from the swivel joint of the fuel line near the pump and to the large number of O rings in different sizes/shape, filters….
    It looks like the business model of this stove is to keep you buying spare parts….

    Reply
    1. 9.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Amit, sorry to hear you’ve found that. I’ve never had that problem myself. I’ve actually used, cleaned and repaired dozens of Omnifuels and always thought they were great stoves.

      Reply
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  17. 10

    Damian

    Brilliant in depth and very informative article thank you very much! This has clearly taken some time to develop and a job well done.

    Reply
    1. 10.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks Damian. It was indeed quite a big undertaking but I’m very glad that you’ve found it useful.

      Reply
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  19. 11

    Ian Johnston

    Hi Tim,

    I can only echo all the positive and praiseworthy comments posted above – thanks for a lot of hard work.

    I have a new Trangia 27 – 1UL with the new hoop type burner which I am happy with. I know that I can also use the Trangia meths burner with this to give me an alternative fuel – fine.

    My question is:-

    What is the BEST multiple burner that could be used with the Trangia set up? Without being arrogant, cost is not an issue. I am prepared to sell the gas burner.

    Would you use the dedicated Trangia X2 or modify a better burner set up that will fit in without being botched.

    Thanks in anticipation.

    Regards

    Ian

    Reply
    1. 11.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks Ian. Are you saying that you want to use a regular multi-fuel stove with your Trangia windshield and/or pots? I hadn’t considered doing that.

      Unless I’ve misunderstood then I suppose it would just be whichever multifuel stove you think is best. You might consider:

        Primus OmniLite Ti – good, reliable and very light
        Soto Muka – no priming so clean and easy to use
        Optimus Polaris – burns all fuels through one nozzle so less faff

      Cheers!
      Tim.

      Reply
      1. 11.1.1

        Ian Johnston

        Hi Tim,

        Thanks for the reply.

        Yes, I would like to use a multiple burner using my Trangia 27 set up.

        Yes I can buy the X2 – no problem – but is there a better multifuel burner that I could use knowing that I might have to modify it a little so that it will sit inside the Trangia 27?

        I wouldn’t but the best multiple burner just to operate it on it’s own. I like the Trangia set up and if no other multifuel burner will fit, then I will buy the X2.

        Best regards

        Ian

  20. 12

    Ewen Cameron

    Edelrid have an adapter for the hexon that allows it to be used in a trangia. It is called a tradapter. I use it in my storm cooker.
    It involves popping off the legs and the tradapter clips round the hexon. It will even fit in the kettle.

    Reply
    1. 12.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks for the heads-up Cameron.

      Reply
  21. 13

    Ian Johnston

    Thanks Ewen,

    I will investigate when I return from France.

    Regards

    Ian

    Reply
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  23. 14

    David Bryant

    Just to let you know that the Optimus Svea 123R happily burns unleaded petrol. Douse it in petrol and lob a match at it to preheat, as the flames die down open the valve and run it on high – great cooker (don’t try and simmer – get too much pressure build-up in the tank and they pop!).

    Reply
    1. 14.1

      Tim Moss

      Awesome. Thanks David. Duly updated!

      Reply
  24. 15

    Max

    Hi Tim,

    Thank you for a lot of hard work and information!

    I’m considering one of the three: Primus OmniLite Ti, Soto Muka, Optimus Polaris.

    Which one in your opinion is the tougher one?

    Thanks,
    Max

    Reply
    1. 15.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks Max. Tougher? Tough question…

      OmniLite (or at least OmniFuel) is a very simple, tried and tested stove that’s easy to maintain so would be a safe bet.

      The Muka is the flimsiest in terms of construction (e.g. thin, wire legs) and has a bit more fancy technology that I suppose could go wrong. But it’s also got no little nozzle to get clogged up and is much cleaner/simpler to use.

      The Polaris feels like quality and a very solid build with strong leg supports. But it’s also putting all fuel types through one nozzle so could potentially be less efficient/reliable over time (I’m guessing here).

      Sorry not to give a more definitive answer!

      Tim.

      Reply
  25. 16

    Jimmy

    Hi Tim, amazing article! I was torn between the Optimus Nova and the coleman but now I have no idea!

    I’m about to embark on a 6 month motorcycle tour, I’m looking for something that burns petrol, compact (very short on space!), relatively maintenance free and reliable (no need of new parts, jets, etc)

    Do you have any advice about which one to go for?

    Many thanks,

    Jimmy

    Reply
    1. 16.1

      Tim Moss

      Hey Jimmy, the only downside with so much information is it can make the choice seem harder. The main thing to remember is that all of these stoves are very similar and ANY of them will be fine.

      For simplicity, get the Nova because you don’t have to fiddle around with different nozzles. For reliability, the MSR and Primus stoves have the longest running reputations. The Coleman Sportster is, of course, a slightly different kettle of fish. Much bigger and heavier than the others with a built-in fuel container.

      I’m sure you won’t be disappointed with a Nova but just shout if you have any more questions.

      Best of luck,
      Tim.
      P.S. If you buy online then please do consider clicking one of the links above first!

      Reply
  26. 17

    Lex Maxwell

    This article is amazingly good with well written and complete information. You need a bit of help with the IT side though: better management of affiliate links and prices (I’m in germany), sortable/filterable lists, smooth navigation to nested content.

    Reply
    1. 17.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks Lex. I’m all ears if you have any suggestions! Sortable/filterable lists would be great. The affiliate links are difficult because it’s hard to track down all the different products in different countries. Recommendations warmly welcomed though.

      Reply
  27. 18

    Michael Gray

    Tim,
    Superb article and super comprehensive. As a professional guide for the last 30 years, I’ve burned through a lot of different stoves and really appreciate your experience in this. I’d like to share some experience as well. I have used the Primus optifuel (is also a fave) and the Optimus Nova and Nova plus in Greenland and Iceland…all were severely clogged and useless within a few days using normal gas pump Benzine in both locales. The only stove I’ve used that really didn’t fuss over that particular benzine or pump no-lead gas, is the MSR Dragonfly. Annoyingly noisy, but seems to burn anything you put in it and still simmered well enough to bake cakes.

    Reply
    1. 18.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks for that Michael. I don’t think I’ve used benzine/kerosene in my stoves so it’s useful to know. I love that you baked cakes using it!

      Reply
  28. 19

    Sonja

    Hi Tim
    I’m looking into the X2 Multifuel from Trangia.
    Do you know what the difference is between the “X2 Multifuel Burner 750001” and the “X2 Multifuel Burner Kit 750100”?
    According to the amazon.com description the only thing different is the bottle. But there is a huge price difference.
    Thanks for the help,

    Reply
    1. 19.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Sonja, I’ve just done a bit of digging. It’s not totally clear but the latter is often referred to as a ‘Part Kit’. That, matched with its very low price, suggests that it’s either just a replacement part (e.g. spare burner) or a maintenance kit (e.g. spare nozzles, o-ring etc). I hope that helps. Do come back and let us know if you find out for certain. I’m sure Trangia themselves would be able to help.

      Reply
  29. 20

    Elmer Smith

    Hi Tim, a lot of information here. Thanks so much for your post, help me a lot to buy a good stove for my trip.

    Reply
  30. 21

    Dosh

    Hi Tim, Do you know anything about using LPG (the kind sold in petrol stations for cars) with a multi-fuel stove? I am currently cycle-touring in Turkey and many of the petrol stations here sell LPG for about half the price of unleaded. Presumably this is some mixture of butane and propane but I have no idea in which proportions. I’m hoping I could use it as cheap and cleaner alternative to petrol, much like white gas. I’ve tried to google it but I can’t find any information on using LPG intended as car fuel in stoves. I don’t want to blow myself up! I’m using a Primus Omnifuel if that makes any difference.

    Reply
    1. 21.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Dosh, interesting question. I’m afraid I don’t know anything about it.

      As I’m sure you know, your Omnifuel will indeed burn butane, propane or a combination of the two when it comes in a small camping gas canister. But I’ve no idea about getting LPG from a petrol station, putting it into your fuel bottle and then burning it that way.

      On the one hand it seems like it should work but, on the other, I also don’t see any mention on Google of anyone else trying it which suggests that there’s a good reason not to.

      I’d be interested to find out more but the conclusion has got to be not to try it. Playing around with pressurised, flammable liquids sounds like a recipe for an injury.

      When I cycled across Turkey, we bought the cheap puncture gas canisters (see here). Although we hardly ever used them because people get inviting us into their houses!

      I’ll let you know if I find out any more about using LPG in a camping stove and please do the same if you find anything out. Good luck with the rest of the ride.

      Tim.

      Reply
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  33. 22

    Mattias

    I loving’ it!

    Thanks!

    I’ve already bought my MF-kitchens before I read your thorough test.

    My passion in life is motorcycles, adventure touring and gravel rally’s. I have a wood stove (The Biolite), but quite often in Sweden it’s raining, so a wood stove is more romantic than practical.

    After looking in outdoor shops, asking in some Facebook groups I came up with 2 stoves.

    The first was the Omnilite Ti and the second was the MSR XGK EX.

    I’m gonna run them both on gasoline to see which one holds up the best. Reputation says XGK EX, but Omnilite can simmer, and I like that when making pasta etc.

    Anyway, big thanks!!

    Best regards,

    Mattias, Sweden

    Reply
    1. 22.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks Matthias. Glad you liked it!

      Reply
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  36. 23

    pascal de wilde

    Hi Tim!
    Thank you for that comprehensive reviewing work! Quite useful reference for people researching camping stove possibilities…

    Just one little detail: the “other name” for “alcohol” should be “methanol” and not “ethanol” – ethanol is the drinkable version, methanol is the one that makes you blind, mad or dead… and should only be used for burning and cleaning. Ethanol will probably burn quite well though… but maybe that’s a bit of a waste ;-)

    Keep up the good work!
    Cheers, Pascal

    Reply
    1. 23.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks for clarifying Pascal. All the different terms can be pretty confusing and I wouldn’t pretend to be an expert.

      I’ll keep ethanol on the list though because it is often used as another name for alcohol and it can be used in alcohol burning stoves.

      Reply
  37. 24

    Ivan Biscan

    Hi Tim I would like you to give me your opinion on it I want to get the best market stove for you would like to know which is the best ever seen in terms of operation and performance because I want to buy the best of the best

    Thank you so much

    Reply
    1. 24.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Ivan. If you want a short answer then get a Primus OmniLite Ti or an MSR (e.g. DragonFly or XGK). They are tried and tested performers. The XGK is probably the most robust and least likely to fail but it’s also a bit primitive e.g. no simmering. The DragonFly and OmniLite are really well respected

      If you want a longer answer then it would depend on whether you want to simmer, use canisters, are worried about weight or interested in ease of use (because you might start considering the Optimus Polaris or the Soto Muka).

      Reply
  38. 25

    Dave

    Hi Tim
    You can indeed simmer with the Optimus 123r, I have five of them and each one simmers quite well. I’m a bit of a stove nut and have a good collection of stoves. The optimus 8rs and 99s I have also simmer very well ;-)
    Dave

    Reply
    1. 25.1

      Dave

      I should add that you don’t want to use too big of a pot, fry pan or kettle on any of the stoves I listed or you will overheat the fuel tank causing the relief valve in the fuel cap to release the extra pressure which makes for a big flame out of the fuel cap. Remember the 123r, 8r and 99 are usually used for one to two people as a general rule.
      Dave

      Reply
  39. 26

    Jules Calagui

    Hi Tim, thank you for having this excellent reviews. I was wondering if you already reviewed the Pinguin Pyro from Czech. It seems a serious competitor to the Omnifuel and Polaris. Does it burn kerosene and diesel? Does it have a simmer function/control? Thank you for your time, jules.

    Reply
    1. 26.1

      Tim Moss

      Hey Jules, I’ve got the basic details of the Pinguin Pyro. They’re on line 18 in the comparison table.

      From what I’ve read, it does not burn kerosene or diesel, only white fuel, unleaded petrol and canisters. I wrote to Pinguin for more information but never heard back. Please do share anything you find out!

      I’ve yet to see or try one but I’d speculate that it’s a simpler, cheaper stove rather than a competitor for the top of the market Primus Omnifuel or Optimus Polaris.

      Fire Maple sell what looks like an almost identical stove under the name FMS-F3 Engine Stove: http://www.fire-maple.com/en/productsinfo.aspx?pid=3

      Reply
  40. 27

    Lindy

    Hi there!
    Thanks Tim for all the info and your navigable and well-maintained site with Q&A/feedback; much appreciated! I just invested in the Trangia Multifuel X2 and I intend to buy ethanol (etanol or etylalkohol as they call it here in Sweden) as back-up for it. I would like to have this on hand in case we have a power outage in the winter and need to use it inside the house or in a not completely well-ventilated area. I have read that this is the safest fuel in non ideally-ventilated places and that it even gives off a little heat in a pinch. Do you have any reflections on this? And any advice when switching between fuel sources, e.g. do you need to rinse out the canister?Thanks in advance!
    All the best,
    Lindy

    Reply
    1. 27.1

      Tim Moss

      Hi Lindy,

      Thanks for the comment. I don’t know a lot about fuels and safety so I can only speculate I’m afraid. I’d suggest doing your own research too.

      I’d assume that ethanol/meths is probably cleaner than burning petrol or diesel, and gives off less fumes (petrol and diesel, for example, will leave black soot in your stove which meths won’t). It will still give off carbon monoxide though which, I think, is the main danger of using stoves inside a tent (or, in your case, an enclosed space).

      As for giving off heat, all stoves will help warm your room, no matter what the fuel. Indeed, in extreme cold, warming a tent with your camping stove is common practice.

      And for rinsing the canister between fuel types, I’m sure it’s a good idea but I doubt it’s too important. If the stove can burn both fuels then I doubt a tiny, diluted trace of another fuel would be a problem. Although, with the Trangia X2, I think you’d be using different containers for each anyway: a pressurised fuel bottle for petrol/diesel/white fuel and the small round tray for meths/ethanol.

      This is definitely isn’t stuff I know a lot about though so please do seek a second opinion! Let me know if you find anything out.

      All the best,
      Tim.

      Reply
    2. 27.2

      Mattias

      Hi Lindy,

      if you just empty the container, no problem.

      I would say “Alkylatbensin” (special, clean powertool gasoline) is even cleaner than T-röd (Alcohol), at least is soot less. Alkylatbensin won’t leave a mark after use.

      If you prepare a meal in a regular home, no problem, but keep it burning for heat hour after hour is 2 VERY DIFFERENT scenarios. I only can say “Fingerspetzgefühlt” is your best friend…

      Good Luck!

      Reply
  41. 28

    Mattias, Sweden

    Hi Tim,

    love your obsession about stoves & adventure!!

    I’m “somewhat” obsessed myself, so I have some MF-kitchens (Omnilite Ti, XGK EX, Polaris & Dragon Fly), the only ones that’s good at handling big pots & pans is the MSR stoves. None of Omnilite, nor Polaris can handle a large pot with HE.

    What I would LIKE to compare is the ability to handle big, heavy pots.

    But help me out here…

    To make a COMPACT cooking system, WITH a GOOD windshield that holds up in any terrain, the ONLY solution I can come up with is mounting my Omnilite Ti inside a Trangia. But then I miss out on the heat exchanger.

    Can you give me some ideas..?

    Love the page, keep up the good work! Can I contribute by buying through one of your channels maybe..?

    Ps. When using the Dragon Fly, it’s not very important, I only use that one for BIG pots camping, never on the go.

    Reply
    1. 28.1

      Tim Moss

      Thanks Mattias. I spent 16 months using:

      • OmniLite Ti stove
      • Primus Eta pot (with heat exchanger)
      • Included Primus windshield and/or one of these folding windshields
      • That would probably be smaller and lighter than your Trangia but give good wind protection.

        Good luck!
        Tim.

      Reply
      1. 28.1.1

        Mattias, Sweden

        Hi!

        But I believe it’s too flimsy to use the included windshield, and then I got to somehow fit an extra pot and a pan, so it gets very clumsy, but still very fragile.

        Was hoping you’d know of any COMPACT, sturdy systems to use except Trangia. Maybe the Optimus Terra HE that at least keeps the burner or bottle inside.

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  44. 29

    Steve

    I use my stoves for fishing in the uk…either gas stoves or the colman sportster. I am having issues with the coleman on unleaded and now feel I want to get something that will burn unleaded without worrying whether it will fire up the next time i try it. What would you suggest as the most reliable for that fuel?

    Reply
    1. 29.1

      Tim Moss

      MSR and Primus stoves have long histories and good reputations. Whisperlite or Omnifuel are probably your best bet. The XGK is reliable but probably overkill: big, heavy, no simmer and really loud.

      If it’s just for fishing in the UK then I’d definitely consider using gas. Cheaper, quicker, smaller, lighter, easier. Recommendations here: http://thenextchallenge.org/camping-gas-canister-stoves/

      Reply
      1. 29.1.1

        Steve

        Thanks for your reply,will certainly go down one of those routes. Gas ceases to become a viable option come late october onwards really. That was why I got the sportster 😉

      2. Tim Moss

        Right, gotcha. Does gas cease to become an option after October because of the cold? The stoves that you let you use the canister upside down make a big difference in cold weather (i.e. the ones with a pre-heat tube). But if you’d rather just get multi fuel then I’ll leave you in peace! ;)

  45. 30

    qforsnc

    Great article – but after sales service can be an issue. I have 3 single burner stoves old enough so that the O rings must be replaced – I contacted Primus yesterday with photos of my stove looking for replacement O Rings- their reply follows…… (with the exception of the O rings – the stoves look like they are built to last forever….)

    Hi,
    Our hose design has changed a couple times over the years, and unfortunately I don’t have that exact o-ring. Also, we don’t have any of the old style hose left that I could use for size comparison to see if any other o-rings I have would fit. Since you do still have the hose, I would recommend fitting an o-ring to it by size. I don’t know of any specific Canadian suppliers, but automotive supply and hardware stores are often good sources for o-rings.

    Sincerely,
    Tyler Loomis
    Product Repair Specialist
    303-996-3728
    [email protected]
    BRUNTON | PRIMUS
    1900 Taylor Ave.
    Louisville, CO 80027

    Reply

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